Draft Engine

Start a draft

For a while I have been working on a generic draft engine for card games. In trading card games (TCGs), drafting is a way to distribute cards in a semi random way, where players interact with how cards are distributed. In the TCG world this is distinct from sealed deck (semi randomly distributed cards, but no player interaction during dustribution) and constructed (you design your deck before playing from a set of allowed cards).

Supported draft styles

My draft engine supports two styles of draft:

  • Grid draft: A draft style for two people where you select rows or columns of cards from 9 face up cards.
  • Regular draft: In this draft style you pick a card from a pack and pass the pack to the next player. It works with 2-8 players, but 6-8 is recommended.

grid draft
The draft engine in action. This example is an Magic the Gathering grid draft.

These forms of draft can be used for most kinds of TCGs. Since the engine is not tied to any specific kind of game, you can draft anything you can give a name and an image. You can draft your family photos if you want to.

Drafts with custom content

The engine works by using a very simple JSON structure to supply card names and card images, it looks like this:

[
  [
    {
      "name": "CardOnePackOne",
      "url": "http://crazymedia.com/cardonepackone.png",
      "id": 0
    },
    {
      "name": "CardTwoPackOne",
      "url": "http://crazymedia.com/cardtwopackone.png",
      "id": 0
    }
  ],
  [
    {
      "name": "CardOnePackTwo",
      "url": "http://crazymedia.com/cardonepacktwo.png",
      "id": 0
    },
    {
      "name": "CardTwoPackTwo",
      "url": "http://crazymedia.com/cardtwopacktwo.png",
      "id": 0
    }
  ]
]

The values are pretty self explanatory, but for clarity:

  • “name” – The name of the card, which you can export when finished drafting.
  • “url” – An URL pointing to an image of the card.
  • “id” – Not in use, so 0 is a fine value.

The engine comes with several predefined card list. Packs will then be drawn from those lists, but if you want to supply your own set (for example a cube or your own game) it is possible to start a draft where you send in any number of packs of cards using the JSON format shown above.

Have fun drafting.

Artifact 1.0.4 – Hello integer overflowing highscore!

Yesterday I finally finished some of my planned Artifact updates. The new version can be downloaded from here. Below is a detailed account of the changes in this version.

  • Added a game mode (rascal), where you can not lose:

    As my 4 year old daughter was playing the game I had to keep typing cheat codes to keep her alive. This made me realise that I could introduce a game mode where it is not possible to lose, and where the player has infinite resources. Once I added the rascal mode she played for quite a while, and she even figured out some smart plays all by herself.

  • Artifact
    Rascal mode allows exploration of the game in a different way. Hello integer overflowing high score!

  • Removed global score tracking:

    Global score tracking from games not played on a server will always be prone to modified clients posting fake scores. This can be mitigated though obfuscation, but not really solved. My implementation was also very bad, and very hard to maintain. Maybe I’ll revisit this one day, but for now I am glad its gone.

  • Removed hash checks of local data:

    I do not care if you hack your local files so that you have insane scores. Hack the game all you want!

  • Prepare for OS X removal of some carbon audio API:

    I kept getting this message in my logs:

    WARNING: 140: This application, or a library it uses, is using the deprecated Carbon Component Manager for hosting Audio Units. Support for this will be removed in a future release. Also, this makes the host incompatible with version 3 audio units. Please transition to the API’s in AudioComponent.h

    The solution was to upgrade openal-soft by building from source, and replace the old openal.dylib that came with Slick2D with the libopenal.dylib built, which I guess uses the API Apple wants you to use.

Artifact 1.0.2.1 – Fixing OS X level 10+ crash

The obligatory level 10 death

For some reason Artifact-1.0.2 would crash on level 10+ on some OS X installations. This seems to stem from some issue with my LWJGL version, the bundled JVM and those OS X installations.

Artifact-1.0.2.1 includes a later JVM which seems to work in my tests. If you experience any issues with it please report using the address here.

Download Artifact-1.0.2.1 for Mac OS X

Artifact-1.0.2

Today I released Artifact-1.0.2 after finally getting my ass around to create a close to fully automated build script for Mac OS X (a topic for another blog post). The full changelog is listed below, but I instead recommend you go get it and try it!

mech-sec-new
New second orb graphics

Changelog:

  1. Added full screen and resolution management in game.
  2. Removed splash screen.
  3. Adjusted difficulties and added new names (Apprentice, Journeyman, Master).
  4. Added additional fire button, allowing better control using a touch-pad.
  5. Redesigned second orb with additional graphics and new behavior.

More in detail:

  1. The splash screen in Artifact was unnecessary and the only issue keeping me from removing it was having in-game window and resolution management.
  2. See above.
  3. The Normal and Hard game difficulties were hardly different in version 1.0.0, while the Not sane difficulty was extremely hard. Now the Apprentice difficulty is much easier then the old Normal, Journeyman is similar to the old Normal, while Master is slightly easier then the old Not Sane difficulty. The change was mainly done to make the initial difficulty easier for new players.
  4. On a touch-pad moving the mouse and clicking might interfere with each other, so I added an alternate fire welder button for those who might prefer that.
  5. The Second orb was very hard to predict and its mechanic felt wrong. The new version is cooler , and most of the time way easier to predict. It also has a slight comeback factor, which is nice in this cutthroat game.

Get 1000 the game

My dad is a great teacher, not too long ago he taught me this game he was having his class play. To play you need a dice, pencils, and paper.

Pencil, paper and dice
All the equipment you need.

The game is quite simple, but complicated to master. It works like this:

  • Everyone draws a 3 by 3 table.
  • The dice is rolled and everyone places the rolled value in one of the empty positions in the table. Everyone has to place the value before the next roll.
  • This is repeated until every position in the table is filled.
  • To find your result you add your rows.

A game
A finished game with score 991.

  • The above table would result in the final sum of 123 + 634 + 234 = 991.
  • The winner is the player with the result closest to 1000. This means that 1001 beats 990 and 951 beats 1051 and so on. It is the distance from 1000 that matters.

To play decent in this game, some knowledge of addition is required. To play well you also need to figure out when it is best to play risky, and when to play safe. This is much harder than it may look.

I really hope that after reading this you will try to play this with your friends. If you have no friends willing to play nearby, you can try my asynchronous version. There you can start a game, and then send your friends a link to join that game. Then they can play whenever they want within a week.

Go play Get 1000

If you want to rejoin a game, your 10 last game links will be stored in your local browser storage for a week. These will be listed in your game list. If you saved a join link, you can also use that to join a game.