Draft Engine

Start a draft

For a while I have been working on a generic draft engine for card games. In trading card games (TCGs), drafting is a way to distribute cards in a semi random way, where players interact with how cards are distributed. In the TCG world this is distinct from sealed deck (semi randomly distributed cards, but no player interaction during dustribution) and constructed (you design your deck before playing from a set of allowed cards).

Supported draft styles

My draft engine supports two styles of draft:

  • Grid draft: A draft style for two people where you select rows or columns of cards from 9 face up cards.
  • Regular draft: In this draft style you pick a card from a pack and pass the pack to the next player. It works with 2-8 players, but 6-8 is recommended.

grid draft
The draft engine in action. This example is an Magic the Gathering grid draft.

These forms of draft can be used for most kinds of TCGs. Since the engine is not tied to any specific kind of game, you can draft anything you can give a name and an image. You can draft your family photos if you want to.

Drafts with custom content

The engine works by using a very simple JSON structure to supply card names and card images, it looks like this:

[
  [
    {
      "name": "CardOnePackOne",
      "url": "http://crazymedia.com/cardonepackone.png",
      "id": 0
    },
    {
      "name": "CardTwoPackOne",
      "url": "http://crazymedia.com/cardtwopackone.png",
      "id": 0
    }
  ],
  [
    {
      "name": "CardOnePackTwo",
      "url": "http://crazymedia.com/cardonepacktwo.png",
      "id": 0
    },
    {
      "name": "CardTwoPackTwo",
      "url": "http://crazymedia.com/cardtwopacktwo.png",
      "id": 0
    }
  ]
]

The values are pretty self explanatory, but for clarity:

  • “name” – The name of the card, which you can export when finished drafting.
  • “url” – An URL pointing to an image of the card.
  • “id” – Not in use, so 0 is a fine value.

The engine comes with several predefined card list. Packs will then be drawn from those lists, but if you want to supply your own set (for example a cube or your own game) it is possible to start a draft where you send in any number of packs of cards using the JSON format shown above.

Have fun drafting.

BitBreeds stand with the humans; we won’t let it slide.

Aliens

With the discovery of a possibly habitable planet around one of our closest stellar neighbours, it has become clear that sooner rather then later, there will be aliens and UFOs around.

A new hope

This summer, UFO Hunter, a simulator for waging war against UFOs was revived and released to the public.

Our consultant getting accustomed to the simulator
Our consultant getting accustomed to the simulator.

Since the future of humanity rests on the shoulders of this simulator and spacex, we have called back one of our most important assets (a veteran from future wars carefully regrown from DNA retrieved in the Artifact) to perform a thorough test of the simulator.

The force awakens

In the spirit of Shi Qiang, Lou Ji and Thomas Wade, we at BitBreeds have declared for the humans. Like our spacex and UFO Hunter friends, we have set our sight on the stars, and we are going for the goal.

What will you do?

Webtorrent; we get signal.

Lately I have been looking into WebRTC which is an open standard for real time communication between browsers. It allows communication styles in the browser which previously were not possible.

WebTorrent uses WebRTC for a protocol similar to bittorrent. Instead of having to download a program or install a browser plugin, you can download a webtorrent (which currently must be seeded as a webtorrent, by forexample instant.io) directly in the browser.

To test Webtorrent, I made a small javascript project. WT-widgets, is a collection of graphics for starting webtorrent downloads and showing download progress. Below is an example where you can download Artifact for Mac OS X using webtorrent.

No seeds

If there are no seeds, you can seed the file yourself by visiting the differently styled button below. This button uses a feature of WT-widgets that does a fallback to XMLHttpRequest after 5 seconds. When it is finished downloading the file, it will start seeding. Then the first button should work, since there is a seed.

The file will be downloaded in your browser, and you can then copy it to your filesystem by clicking the link that appears when the file finished downloading. This does not follow the usual download flow, so one of the aims of WT-widgets is to ensure that it clear to the user that a download is happening. I am not sure how well my widgets succeed in that regard, as my current widgets might not be the best at communicating that there is a download happening.

Suggestions or pull requests with fixes/additions are always welcome. I hope to expand WT-widgets with some widgets that show progress horizontally, as well as some widgets that more clearly show when it is in the different states of a download.

What Webtorrent sorely needs

While seeding in the browser works great, I do not want to have a browser fired up at all times to ensure there are seeds for my content. The best option I found for seeding webtorrents was webtorrent-hybrid, but when I tried it, I sadly could not get it to build.

Once Webtorrent has a solid solution for server side bootstrap seeding, I think it is will become a great alternative for distributing some kinds of content.

Take off every 'ZIG'!!

Pear pram construction

My 3 year old daughter’s current favourite book is Jakob Martin Strid’s Den utrolige historien om den kjempestore pæra. In the story a giant pear is made hollow, and eventually turned into a boat. I decided to try and make a similar upright floating pear-boat out of a normal pear. One that my my daughter could play with once finished. Off I went to buy a pear and tools, the pear I ended up with have these specs:

  • Weighs around 238 g.
  • Displaces approximately 225 ml of water. This means it is slightly more dense then water since the weight of that water would be approximately 225 g.
  • Judging from the pears available in the shop, the one I chose was slightly more symmetric then most pears.

In addition to the pear, the tools I used are shown in the image below:

pear-tools
Pear, knife, melon baller (the MVT in pear pram construction), coins, thread.

The first step in pear pram creation, is to cut the windows using a knife. Once that is done carve out the inside using the melon baller. I recommend making the windows close to the top of the pear. If you make them too low they will result in water intake when launched. It is better to create the windows high initially and expand them downwards once you have a feeling for how the pear floats.

After carving out the core and flesh.
After carving out the core and flesh.

Another great reason for making the windows high up is lowering the center of mass. Pears have not yet been cultivated to float upright, and the center of mass is way too high for that. Having a too high center of mass on a ship is catastrophic. In its unmodified form a hollow pear will most likely perform worse then the Vasa on its maiden voyage.

To lower the center of mass even more, it is important to carve out as much as possible of the “roof”. Since the stalk extends into the pear this is difficult. It is easy to ruin the pear if you use too much force; be careful.

Even with the windows high up and a very light roof, the center of mass is still too high. Initially I added coins on the inside as ballast, this worked if I put the pear very carefully into the water, but it was still prone to capsizing.

Pear in bowl
Coins on a thread prevents capsizing. The pear is finally approved for transport of Lego men

To remedy this I moved the center of mass even lower by adding ballast on a thread below the pear. This was done by creating a knot on the thread and using a needle to get it through the bottom of the pear. Then the coins were added as shown in the picture. To ensure that water would not leak along the thread into the pear, I greased the entry points.

In its finished form the pear is quite stable, it could hold a surprising amount of Lego men without capsizing. I never got around  to test adding a sail, but I think it might be stable enough to support a small sail.

Sadly rot is an inevitability facing all pear prams. If you have a great idea for prolonging pear pram life, please leave a comment.